“Love”

 Good literature challenges expectations, preexisting norms, and grand paradigms that people have taken granted for; it defies conformation and refuses to be blind to human emotions and experiences; good literature experiments with the human conditions and ultimately brings more wisdom to the human world than anything else can. Brazilian author Clarice Lispector’s story “Love,” withContinue reading ““Love””

Psychoanalysis of Racism–Black Skin, White Masks

Psychoanalysis of Racism: book review of Black Skin, White Masks There are many ways to dissect and dismantle racism, and Fanon chooses psychoanalysis in his nonfiction Black Skin, White Masks, a book that explores the realm of Black people’s consciousness when white people enter it and imposes a hierarchy of racial superiority and inferiority. IContinue reading “Psychoanalysis of Racism–Black Skin, White Masks”

The civilized and the barbarians: the formation of an oppressive system

The civilized and the barbarians: the formation of an oppressive system –book review of Waiting for the Barbarians On the first day of the Student Diversity Leadership Conference, the family group spent the bulk of the session discussing the system of oppression, linking our understanding and experiences to the larger system that justifies injustice, violence,Continue reading “The civilized and the barbarians: the formation of an oppressive system”

The metaphorical meanings of borders in Borderlands–Borderlands

The metaphorical meanings of borders in Borderlands –book review of Borderlands Unlike countless traditional literature and academic essays about the physical US-Mexico borders and the crossing experiences, Anzaldúa’s Borderlands explores the meanings behind such physical borders—including the psychological, cultural, spiritual, and even sexual implications behind obvious frontiers that separate two nations. Spanning from personal anecdotesContinue reading “The metaphorical meanings of borders in Borderlands–Borderlands”

A story that heals under its dark and depressing guise–The Ballad of the Sad Cafe

A story that heals under its dark and depressing guise –book review of The Ballad of the Sad Cafe When I first finished reading The Ballad of the Safe Café, there were many things that I did not understand. I knew immediately that the book reads like William Faulkner’s A Rose for Emily, another classicContinue reading “A story that heals under its dark and depressing guise–The Ballad of the Sad Cafe”

A story of historical horror and human resilience–Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl

A story of historical horror and human resilience –book review of Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl I have always wanted to read this book but never had a chance to pick it up until recently, when I came across some research about the Holocaust and WWII. Even though I am now fourContinue reading “A story of historical horror and human resilience–Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl”

Beyond human nature: the bitter truth of poverty and class differences–book review of The Pearl

Beyond human nature: the bitter truth of poverty and class differences book review of The Pearl               Almost every introduction and book review focus on the nature of the book as a “parable about wealth and the evil it can bring.” As much as the book deals with greed, evilness, the danger of wealth, whatContinue reading “Beyond human nature: the bitter truth of poverty and class differences–book review of The Pearl”

A deferred dream in a plain play–A Raisin in the Sun

              What happens to a dream deferred? Coming from the famous poem of Langston Hughes, the title of the book sums up the central idea of the play—when a dream is deferred, it not only dries up like a raisin in the sun but is also capable of exploding. Surrounding a three-generation African American household,Continue reading “A deferred dream in a plain play–A Raisin in the Sun”

Fiction or reality: what a good story tells—The Things They Carried

 “Stories are for joining the past to the future. Stories are for those late hours in the night when you can’t remember how you got from where you were to where you are. Stories are for eternity, when memory is erased, when there is nothing to remember except the story.” Book Introduction: The Things TheyContinue reading “Fiction or reality: what a good story tells—The Things They Carried”

Nonviolence, injustice, and change–March

Book introduction: March is a graphic novel that vividly presents a first-hand account of John lewis’s lifelong struggle for civil and human rights. The inspiration of the book was drawn from the 1958 comic book Martin Luther King that inspired generations. Now, March becomes one of the books to inspire others by telling a greatContinue reading “Nonviolence, injustice, and change–March”

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